• Deer Lake Law Group Lawyer & Notary Public, Real Estate, Wills and Estates, Incorporation, Family Law & Mediation Burnaby Law Office
  • Deer Lake Law Group Lawyer & Notary Public, Real Estate, Wills and Estates, Incorporation, Family Law & Mediation Burnaby Law Office
  • Deer Lake Law Group Lawyer & Notary Public, Real Estate, Wills and Estates, Incorporation, Family Law & Mediation Burnaby Law Office
  • Deer Lake Law Group Lawyer & Notary Public, Real Estate, Wills and Estates, Incorporation, Family Law & Mediation Burnaby Law Office
  • Deer Lake Law Group Lawyer & Notary Public, Real Estate, Wills and Estates, Incorporation, Family Law & Mediation Burnaby Law Office

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  • Deer Lake Law Group Lawyer & Notary Public, Family Law & Mediation Burnaby Law Office
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couple-holding-hands4Your conduct throughout your divorce process now, may affect how your potential future-partners will judge your character. 

If your divorce settlement was reached in a cooperative and mutually satisfactory manner, including an orderly division of assets, proper financial support, and a thoughtful parenting a
rrangement for your young children, your future-partner should recognize the enormous contribution that such a ‘mature’ separation makes to all your subsequent relationships. 
Parting with a spouse, or the other parent, on good terms, should result in a reduction in any on-going conflict over support obligations, parenting time, and other disputes over what ‘was fair and unfair’. Peace with the previous partner should facilitate the bloom of the current relationship.
 
On the other hand, if enormous amounts of money were spent on fighting about family issues that should have been settled quickly, that divorce process could be a red flag for future suitors. A history of aggressive litigation should be taken into consideration before entering into a serious relationship, as this individual may be traveling with excessive ‘previous relationship baggage’.
 
Of course, there are two sides to every divorce story.
 
If one party to the break-up is aggressively pursuing a court-driven settlement, it may be virtually impossible to avoid being drawn down the warpath. Although it may be unpleasant to reveal the details of past relationships, it is worthwhile to have this conversation with your new partner. As your current significant other, he or she should understand the reasons behind your difficult, and likely, expensive divorce.  
 
Above all else, make every effort to avoid being the instigator of unnecessary conflict as this lays a strong foundation for relationship successful in the future.
 
  
 
 
There are a few first practical steps which should be taken before or during the separation and in anticipation of divorce:
 
1.Change mailing address:  
 
As soon as you suspect that you and your partner will be separating, no matter who is initiating the separation, change your mailing address for all of your sensitive mail.
 
2.Change passwords:
 
It is likely that your partner knows your passwords and may be checking emails, facebook and bank accounts.  
 
3.Documents:  
 
Make copies of financial records and documents relating to family property and family debt.  Gather records proving what constitute family property and what may be exempt from family property. 
        
4. Speak to a Family Law professional:
 
Educate yourself on the various options of achieving your goal - family mediation, collaborative lawyers, negotiated settlement, and so on. Most lawyers offer a free initial meeting to explain the process and provide an estimate of fees. 
 
To book a free initial consulation with a family law lawyer at Deer Lake Law, please call 604 430 2345.
 
 

At one point in time, parents fought over "Custody" - but not anymore.

In British Columbia, the law with respect to children and parenting changed drastically when the Family Law Act came into effect in March of 2013. The new Act eliminated the old concepts of "custody" and "access". The new Act replaced those terms with plain language concepts: parental responsibilities, parenting time, and contact.

The legislation is now less focused on one or both parents winning control ("custody"), or in identifying a "primary" parent of a child or children.

The new Act instead enumerates various specific, common-sense parental responsibilities that one or both parents may exercise, together or exclusively, and establishes some principles for allocating parenting time.

As a general rule, the courts of British Columbia seek to avoid anything that resembles "custody" with the view that the best interests of the children are served when both parents share in parental responsibilities and parenting time.

The bottom line: If you split up from your partner, don't expect "custody" of your children because it doesn't exist anymore. Even if your former spouse has a 'messy home', 'bad habits' or 'poor character', you should expect to share parenting time and parenting responsibilities with your 'Parenting Partner' indefinitely.

 

Contact Us

Deer Lake Law Group

Suite 126,
4946 Canada Way
Burnaby, B.C. V5G 4H7
Telephone:   604 430-2345
Facsimile:     888 712-2264
Email: info@deerlakelaw.ca

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